Dylon Lamalie

ATLANTIC OCEAN (April 25, 2020) Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Dylon Lamalie, from Fostoria, Ohio, practices piping aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) in the Atlantic Ocean April 25, 2020.

The Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HSTCSG) remains at sea in the Atlantic as a certified carrier strike group force ready for tasking in order to protect the crew from the risks posed by COVID-19, following their successful deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operation. Keeping HSTCSG at sea in U.S. 2nd Fleet, in the sustainment phase of OFRP, allows the ship to maintain a high level of readiness during the global COVID-19 pandemic.

(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Samuel Gruss)

Carl Basinger

PORT HUENEME, Calif. – “We Build, We Fight” has been the motto of the U. S. Navy’s Construction Force, known as the “Seabees,” for more than seven decades. The Navy Seabees are an elite group of personnel trained in both combat and the craft skills of the construction industry.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Carl Basinger, a native of Ottawa, Ohio, builds and fights around the world as a member of a naval construction battalion center located in Port Hueneme, California.

Basinger is serving as a Navy engineering aide, who is responsible for the surveying and material testing for construction projects.

“In addition to surveying and testing, we also work a lot with design and blueprints,” Basinger said.

Building in austere environments can be a challenge. Fighting in harsh conditions can also be a challenge. Building in austere environments while fighting in harsh conditions takes a special kind of person with a great deal of perseverance and determination, according to officials with the U.S. Navy History and Heritage Command. These are the kinds of people being trained at Port Hueneme, to provide crucial support to Seabee units deployed around the world.

The jobs of some of the Seabees today have remained unchanged since World War II, when the Seabees paved the 10,000-mile road to victory for the allies in the Pacific and in Europe, said Lara Godbille, director of the U.S. Navy Seabee Museum.

“I like the camaraderie and making friends from all over the world,” said Basinger. “Also I like working on projects and seeing the progression in real-time.”

Seabees have served in all American conflicts for nearly 80 years. They have also supported humanitarian efforts using their construction skills to help communities around the world following earthquakes, hurricanes and other natural disasters.

Basinger is a 2014 Ottawa Glandorf High School graduate. According to Basinger, the values required to succeed in the Navy are similar to those found in Ottawa.

“I learned the importance of respecting others and the value of hard work,” said Basinger. “These things have helped me in my Navy career because of the type of work we do. We have a hands-on job.”

Port Hueneme is the West Coast homeport of the Navy’s Seabees. It’s one of five learning sites in the Center for Seabees and Facilities Engineering domain. They train and develop sailors, soldiers, airman, and Marines in construction trades and military skills for Department of Defense operating forces to accomplish contingency and peacetime construction, chemical, biological, and radiological operations, and humanitarian assistance missions worldwide.

Port Hueneme and the men and women who serve there play a key role in the Navy’s broader mission of protecting American interests on the world’s oceans.

According to Navy officials, maintaining maritime superiority is a vital part of a Navy that is present today and prepared for tomorrow. The impact affects Americans and their interests around the world, as more than 70 percent of the Earth is covered by water and 90 percent of all trade travels by sea.

The foundation of the Navy the nation needs includes a focus on warfighting, warfighters and the future of the fighting force.

“I am confident that we will maximize the Navy we have today while delivering the Navy that our nation will rely upon tomorrow,” said Adm. Mike Gilday, Chief of Naval Operations. “We will do so with urgency. Our fleet will be a potent, formidable force that competes around the world every day, deterring those who would challenge us while reassuring our allies and partners.”

Though there are many ways for sailors to earn distinction in their command, community and career, Basinger is most proud of receiving a plaque for work he did on the traveling Vietnam Memorial Wall.

“I am proud of that because I felt like it gave back to the past generations who gave their lives to defend our country,” said Basinger.

Serving in the Navy is a continuing tradition of military service for Basinger, who has military ties with family members who have previously served. Basinger is honored to carry on the family tradition.

“My grandfather, uncles, aunts and cousins have served in the military,” said Basinger. “It makes me feel proud to carry on the family legacy of military service.”

As a member of the U.S. Navy, Basinger, as well as other sailors, know they are a part of a service tradition providing unforgettable experiences through leadership development, world affairs and humanitarian assistance. Their efforts will have a lasting effect around the globe and for generations of sailors who will follow.

“I really enjoy what we do,” said Basinger. “I like the humanitarian aspect of the job and learning about the Seabees rich history. I am proud to be a part of it.”

Posted by Navy Office Of Community Outreach.

Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Bradley Gee.

Isaiah Foster

CHINA LAKE, Calif. – Petty Officer 3rd Class Isaiah Foster, a native of Upper Sandusky, Ohio, plays a key role in supporting the Navy’s research, testing and evaluation of cutting-edge weapons systems for today’s sailors.

Foster is a yeoman serving at Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS) China Lake, known as “Secret City.”

“A vast weapons testing and training range operated by the U.S. Navy in California’s Mojave Desert, this location is where military and civilian personnel developed or tested nearly every significant airborne weapon system since 1943,” said NAWS China Lake public affairs officer, Margo Allen.

As a Navy yeoman, Foster is responsible for all administrative duties for the command.

“I enjoy the peace and quiet of serving in China Lake,” Foster said.

Foster is a 2014 Kentridge High School graduate. According to Foster, the values required to succeed in the Navy are similar to those found in Upper Sandusky.

“I learned communication skills necessary to serve in the Navy,” Foster said. “Without these skills the job would be a lot more difficult.”

NAWS China Lake is located in the Western Mojave Desert region of California, approximately 150 miles north of Los Angeles. The installation is the Navy’s largest single piece of real estate, representing 85 percent of the Navy’s land for Research, Development, Acquisition, Test and Evaluation (RDAT&E) use and 38 percent of the Navy’s land holdings worldwide. In total, its two ranges and main site cover more than 1.1 million acres, an area larger than the state of Rhode Island.

Operating a facility as large as China Lake is a monumental task, considering 19,600 square miles of restricted and controlled airspace makes up 12 percent of California’s total airspace. Compounding the challenge is the diverse nature of the operations that includes weapons testing and evaluation in air and ground ranges, research and development in highly sophisticated laboratories, and numerous science and technology projects ranging from sensors to chemical and material systems.

The workforce at China Lake is a combination of military, civilians and contractors employed across many different commands focused on researching and evaluating cutting edge technological systems, and training of Navy personnel preparing for combat in areas around the world.

China Lake and the men and women who serve there play a key role in the Navy’s broader mission of protecting American interests on the world’s oceans.

According to Navy officials, maintaining maritime superiority is a vital part of a Navy that is present today and prepared for tomorrow. The impact affects Americans and their interests around the world, as more than 70 percent of the Earth is covered by water and 90 percent of all trade travels by sea.

The foundation of the Navy the nation needs includes a focus on warfighting, warfighters and the future of the fighting force.

“I am confident that we will maximize the Navy we have today while delivering the Navy that our nation will rely upon tomorrow,” said Adm. Mike Gilday, Chief of Naval Operations. “We will do so with urgency. Our fleet will be a potent, formidable force that competes around the world every day, deterring those who would challenge us while reassuring our allies and partners.”

Though there are many ways for sailors to earn distinction in a command, community and career, Foster is most proud of being promoted to third class petty officer.

“It shows my growth and that I am working hard in my career,” Foster said.

As a member of the U.S. Navy, Foster, as well as other sailors, know they are a part of a service tradition providing unforgettable experiences through leadership development, world affairs and humanitarian assistance. Their efforts will have a lasting effect around the globe and for generations of sailors who will follow.

“Serving in the Navy means I am doing something with my life and allows me to give back my country,” Foster said.

Story courtesy of Navy Office Of Community Outreach.

Sergio Mata

YOKOSUKA, Japan (Jan. 29, 2020) Interior Communications Electrician 3rd Class Sergio Mata, from Bowling Green, Ohio, and Interior Communications Electrician 3rd Class Jessica Yurcak, from Riverside, California (left), measure a wind sensor on the mast of the Navy’s forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76).

Ronald Reagan, the flagship of Carrier Strike Group 5, provides a combat-ready force that protects and defends the collective maritime interests of its allies and partners in the Indo-Pacific region.

(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Erica Bechard)

Dylon Lamalie

ARABIAN SEA (Feb. 2, 2020) Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Dylon Lamalie, from Fostoria, Ohio, signals from the hangar bay of the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) to the fast combat support ship USNS Supply (T-AOE 6), not pictured, during a replenishment-at-sea in the Arabian Sea Feb. 2, 2020.

The Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations in support of naval operations to ensure maritime stability and security in the Central Region, connecting the Mediterranean and the Pacific through the western Indian Ocean and three strategic choke points.

(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Benjamin Waddell)

Dylon Lamalie

(Dec. 27, 2019) Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Dylon Lamalie, from Fostoria, Ohio, stands the signalman watch in the hangar bay of the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) during a replenishment-at-sea in the Arabian Sea Dec. 27, 2019.

The Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations in support of naval operations to ensure maritime stability and security in the Central Region, connecting the Mediterranean and the Pacific through the western Indian Ocean and three strategic choke points.

Photo and information courtesy of Navy Office of Community Outreach.

U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication 3rd Class Kaysee Lohmann

Daniel Leaks

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Theodore Quintana, Navy Office of Community Outreach

MILLINGTON, Tenn. – As Americans reflect on the service of military men and women this Veterans Day, some may not realize that they are fellow residents with those who serve in the U.S. Navy Reserve.

Petty Officer 1st Class Daniel Leaks, a resident of Findlay, Ohio, supports and defends freedom around the world, as a Navy operations specialist, who is responsible for plotting ship’s position, heading, and speed.

Leaks is a 2002 Mackenzie High School graduate and native of Detroit. Leaks also earned a degree from University of Findlay in 2014 majoring in graphic design.

Findlay Resident, Daniel Leaks, Embodies Veterans Day Values as a Member of U.S. Navy Reserve

Reservists seamlessly support and actively aid military missions while continuing to lead their own independent lives in the civilian world, according to Navy officials.

“The Navy Reserve is a 100K strong team of sailors embedded across the fabric of society, loyal and dedicated patriots, serving both in uniform and civilian jobs, ready to defend the homeland and deploy across the world in a moment’s notice,” said Vice Adm. Luke McCollum, Chief of Navy Reserve.

The Navy Reserve provides strategic depth to America’s Navy as it protects the American homeland and advances economic prosperity by preserving freedom of the seas.

“Marathon Petroleum Corporation’s outstanding culture has allowed me to serve my country worry-free from an employment standpoint,” said Leaks. “I also contribute being able to balance civilian and Navy to my wife, whom is a prior service member.”

As a Navy reservist, Leaks serves with Navy Operational Support Center Toledo responsible for serving as the operational support unit’s career counselor. The command’s mission is to support the Navy and Marine Corps team in the training and administration of the Navy Reserves with mission ready units, equipment, and individuals throughout the full range of operations from peace to war.

Leaks is playing an important part in America’s focus on rebuilding military readiness, strengthening alliances and reforming business practices in support of the National Defense Strategy.

A key element of the Navy the Nation needs is tied to the fact that America is a maritime nation, according to Navy officials, and that the nation’s prosperity is tied to the ability to operate freely on the world’s oceans. More than 70 percent of the Earth’s surface is covered by water; 80 percent of the world’s population lives close to a coast; and 90 percent of all global trade by volume travels by sea.

“Our priorities center on people, capabilities and processes, and will be achieved by our focus on speed, value, results and partnerships,” said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. “Readiness, lethality and modernization are the requirements driving these priorities.”

Though there are many ways for sailors to earn distinction in their command, community and career, Leaks is most proud of being certified as a Plane Captain for F/A 18 Super Hornet Jets, qualified career counselor and earning three Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medals.

“I am very proud to achieve becoming a certified Plane Captain,” said Leaks. “Obtaining this certification required a full year of studying, patience and learning.”

Serving in the Navy is a continuing tradition of military service for Leaks, who has military ties with family members who have previously served. Leaks is honored to carry on that family tradition.

“My big brother served in the United States Marines prior to me serving and is currently serving in the United States Army,” said Leaks. “My brother created a culture of professionalism while he served in the military and I wanted to follow his example.”

As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied upon assets, Leaks and other sailors know they are part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes providing the Navy the nation needs.

“Serving in the Navy allows me to defend my country and there is no greater feeling,” added Leaks. “The military has also allowed me to travel the world, become a professional and become a better role model for my community and my family.”

Abbygal N. Chamberlain

U.S. Air Force Airman Abbygal N. Chamberlain graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, San Antonio, Texas.

The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training also earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force.

Chamberlain is the daughter of Richard R. and Jodi L. Chamberlain of Ada, Ohio. She is a 2019 graduate of Ada High School, Ada, Ohio.

Jacob C. Frost

U.S. Air Force Airman Jacob C. Frost graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, San Antonio, Texas.

The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training also earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force.

He is a 2017 graduate of Findlay Digital Academy, Findlay, Ohio.

Ryann E. Hayes

U.S. Air Force Airman Ryann E. Hayes graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, San Antonio, Texas.

The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills.

Airmen who complete basic training also earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force.

Hayes is the daughter of John Hayes of Defiance, Ohio, and Elizabeth Hayes of Sandusky, Ohio. She is a 2019 graduate of Fostoria Junior Senior High School, Fostoria, Ohio.